Drought Information Statement
Issued by NWS San Angelo, TX

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Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service San Angelo TX
526 PM CDT Thu Sep 8 2022

...Drought conditions improved across West Central Texas...

The latest U.S Drought Monitor (USDM), released on September 8 2022,
indicates that exceptional drought (D4) conditions were present across
southeast Taylor, southern Callahan, and extreme northern Coleman
Counties. Extreme drought (D3) conditions were present across much of
the Interstate 20 corridor and south toward northern Sterling and Coke
Counties. Severe drought (D2) conditions exist across much of the rest
of West Central Texas. Moderate drought (D1) conditions were present
across much of the northern Edwards Plateau and the northern Big
Country. Abnormally dry (D0) conditions were present across much of
Throckmorton and eastern Haskell Counties.

Summary of Impacts...

Fire Weather Impacts...

Dry air, very hot temperatures, and periods of gusty winds
combined to enhance critical fire weather conditions, at times.
Fire danger can change from day to day as wind and relative
humidity vary. The Texas Forest Service advises to watch out for
key weather thresholds of winds above 15 mph and relative humidity
values below 25 percent. When these thresholds are exceeded,
expect the fire danger will be elevated.

As of September 8th, countywide outdoor burn bans were supported in
Throckmorton, Jones, Shackelford, Nolan, Callahan, Coke, Coleman,
Concho, Crockett, Schleicher, and Menard Counties.


Agricultural Impacts...

Much needed precipitation occurred across the Hydrologic Service Area
(HSA) from the middle of August through September 8th. During this time
frame, much of the area received between three and ten inch of rainfall.
Localized areas received less than 2 inches, mainly across the northern
Concho Valley and portions of the Big Country.

Much needed rainfall occurred again, but totals varied depending on
location. Stock tanks caught some runoff, but were still in bad shape.
Pastures were greening up and will provide decent grazing for livestock
soon. Small grain plantings will start son for grazing. Nearly all
cotton fields were zeroed out and shredded or plowed.

Climate Summary...

Much needed precipitation occurred across the Hydrologic Service Area
(HSA) from mid August through September 8th. Rainfall amounts across the
region were generally above normal, with a few areas across the Big
Country and northern Concho Valley seeing near normal rainfall.

From mid August through September 8th, much of the area received
between three and ten inch of rainfall. Localized areas received less
than 2 inches, mainly across the northern Concho Valley and portions of
the Big Country. Temperatures for the second half of August were closer
to seasonal normals, although several days continued above normal. The
area experienced below normal temperatures for the first few days of
September, followed by slightly above normal temperatures after that.

Since the beginning of January 2022, the
following precipitation amounts have been recorded:

Abilene received 8.72 inches of rainfall in 2022, which is 9.00 inches
below normal.

San Angelo received 7.58 inches of rainfall in 2022, which is 6.99
inches below normal.

Junction received 8.96 inches of rainfall in 2022, which is 6.39 inches
below normal.

During the month of August, 2022, the following precipitation amounts
have been recorded:

Abilene received 3.01 of rainfall, which is 0.48 inches above normal.

San Angelo received 2.44 inches of rainfall, which is 0.02 inches above
normal.

Junction received 3.71 inches of rainfall, which is 1.68 inches above
normal.

Precipitation/Temperature Outlook...

According to the Climate Predication Center, La Nina conditions
are present and are likely to continue through the fall and into the
winter. The La Nina pattern may weaken toward the end of winter.

Across West Central Texas, the CPC outlook shows increased
chances of above below precipitation and above normal temperatures in
the 6-10 day period. The outlook shows increased chances of near normal
precipitation and above normal temperatures in the 8-14 day period.
These outlooks were updated on September 8th.

The latest U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook for September 1 through
November 30 (issued by the CPC), shows that drought conditions will
improve, but remain across West Central Texas.

Hydrologic Summary And Outlook...

According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), gaged streamflows
across most of West Central Texas are normal to below normal for
this time of year.

Reservoir conditions as of September 1:

       Current  Conservation  Current         %
   Elevation       CapacityCapacity   Conservation
Reservoir    (ft)       (ac-ft)   (ac-ft)   Capacity

Fort Phantom Hill 1629.94 70030    49371 70
Lake Stamford 1413.26 51570    35651     69
Hubbard Creek 1177.46 313298   229920 73
Hords Creek Lake 1884.19   8443      2673 32
Lake Brownwood 1417.94 128839    88550 68
E V Spence 1854.94 517272   101888 20
O H Ivie 1530.08 554340   237631 43
O C Fisher 1861.21 119445     4256  4
Twin Buttes     1919.36 182454    58610 32
Lake Nasworthy      1871.26           9615      8282            86

Next Issuance Date...

This product will be updated on August 26, 2022 or sooner if necessary
in response to significant changes in conditions.

&&

Related Web Sites

Additional information or current drought conditions may be found
at the following web addresses:

U.S. Drought Monitor:
http://www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu

NOAA Drought Page:
http://www.drought.noaa.gov

Climate Prediction Center (CPC):
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov

San Angelo NWS:
http://www.weather.gov/sjt

Additional River Information:

National Weather Service (NWS):
http://www.water.weather.gov/ahps

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS):
http://water.usgs.gov/

US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE):
http://www.usace.army.mil

Acknowledgments:
The drought monitor is a multi-agency effort involving NOAA`s
National Weather Service and National Centers for Environmental
Information...the USDA...state and regional center climatologists
and the National Drought Mitigation Center. Information for this
statement has been gathered from NWS and FAA observation sites...
state cooperative extension services...the USDA...USACE and USGS.

Questions or Comments:
If you have any questions or comments about this Drought
Information Statement, please contact:

National Weather Service
7654 Knickerbocker Rd.
San Angelo, Texas 76904
Phone: 325-944-9445
E-mail: sr-sjt.webmaster@noaa.

$$


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